DELTA WATER TREATMENT PLANT

Drinking Water Consumer Confidence Report

For 2019

The Delta Water Treatment Plant has prepared the following report to provide information to you, the consumer, on the quality of our drinking water.  Included within this report is general health information, water quality test results, how to participate in decisions concerning your drinking water and water system contacts.

The Delta Water Treatment Plant was placed in service in 2006 and is located at 7697 County Road H, across the street from the Delta Reservoirs.  The facility is an integrated membrane water treatment plant. There are two types of membranes used in the treatment process, Microfiltration (MF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO).  This newer technology treats a full flow through the continuous microfiltration (CMF) train followed by a split stream flowing through the reverse osmosis (RO) units. The treatment process lowers the hardness and the turbidity of the reservoir water while filtering out bacteria and viruses.  With this modernization the Village of Delta will be able to better serve the present and anticipated customer base well into the future.  Before the water is pumped to you, the customer, fluoride, chlorine and caustic soda are added to the finished water.  Fluoride aids in the prevention of tooth decay, while chlorine is used as a disinfectant and caustic soda raises the pH in order to stabilize the water, to prevent corrosion of pipes in the distribution system.

The plant’s filtration capacity is rated at 1.2 MGD (million gallons per day).

The plant produced 252.69 MG (million gallons) in 2019.  The average production per day was 0.692 MGD.
For finished water storage the plant has two (2), 200,000-gallon clear wells on-site, one 200,000-gallon elevated storage tank on Helvetia Street and a 600,000-gallon elevated storage tank (West Side) located on Co. Rd. 10. The West Side pump station, which enables the water to be pumped into this large elevated tank, has remote monitoring and operational capabilities.

Source Water Information

The Delta Water Treatment Plant receives its raw water from one of two (2) reservoirs that are filled with water pumped from Bad Creek.  Primarily, the water used at the water plant comes from Reservoir #2, with Reservoir #1 as a backup.  The watershed for Bad Creek is roughly bordered by State Route 109 N to the east, St. Rt. 20 to the north, St. Rt. 108 to the west and County Road H to the south.  The Village of Delta also has an emergency connection with the City of Wauseon, located near the intersection of St. Rt. 2 and Co. Rd. 11. During the year of 2019, 863,000 gallons were used from this connection.

Source Water Assessment

For the purpose of source water assessments, all surface waters are considered to be susceptible to contamination. By their nature, surface waters are accessible and can be readily contaminated by chemicals and pathogens, with relatively short travel times from the source to the intake.  Based on the information compiled for the assessment, the Village of Delta drinking water source protection area is susceptible to agricultural runoff (fertilizer/pesticide application and storage, animal feedlots, row crops), above ground storage tanks, oil and gas production activities, wastewater treatment discharges, and commercial sources.

It is important to note that this assessment is based on available data, and therefore may not reflect current conditions in all cases.  Water quality, land uses and other activities that are potential sources of contamination may change with time.

While the source water for the Village of Delta Public Water System is considered susceptible to contamination, historically, the Village of Delta Public Water System has effectively treated this source to meet drinking water quality standards. For a direct link to the source water assessment is https://wwwapp.epa.ohio.gov/gis/swpa/OH2600311.pdf or contact David Daniel at ( 419-822-4143 ) for a paper copy of this report.

What are sources of contamination to drinking water?

The sources of drinking water both tap water and bottled water includes rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife; (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming; (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses; (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems; (E) radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, USEPA prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water which must provide the same protection for public health.  Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

Who needs to take special precautions?

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infection.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

License to Operate

The Village of Delta Water Treatment Plant has a current, unconditioned license to operate our water system as directed by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA).

Monitoring & Reporting Violations & Enforcement Actions

The Village of Delta Water Treatment Plant did not monitor and report results for the presence of total coliform bacteria in the public drinking water system during the July 2019 time period, as required by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.  This resulted in a Tier 3 violation and a public notice was mailed out explaining the issue.  The Delta Water Treatment Plant has taken steps to ensure that adequate monitoring will be performed in the future.

The Village of Delta Water Treatment Plant did not meet treatment requirements, resulting in a Tier 2 violation.  From September 17, 2019 to October 2, 2019 we used a membrane filter which was not operating properly and therefore we did not meet treatment requirements during that time period. The necessary replacement parts arrived, and we were able to replace the faulty parts to ensure treatment requirements were met.

About your drinking water

The EPA requires regular sampling to ensure drinking water safety.  The Delta Water Treatment Plant conducted sampling for bacteria, inorganic, nitrates, synthetic organic chemicals (Group 1), volatile organic chemicals, disinfection byproducts during 2019.  The Ohio EPA requires us to monitor for some contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently.  Some of our data, though accurate, may be more than one year old.

Listed in the following table is the information on those contaminants that were found in the Village of Delta drinking water.

 

Contaminants

(Units)

MCLG MCL Level

Found

Range of

Detections

Violation Sample Typical Source of Contaminants
Residual Disinfection  
Total Chlorine

(mg/L)

4 MRDLG 4

MRDLG

1.73
ppm*
1.56-

1.91
ppm

No 2019 Water additive to control microbes  
 
Microbiological Contaminants  
Turbidity

(% of samples meeting standard)

N/A TT 99.9% 100% No 2019 Soil run-off  
 
Turbidity

(NTU)

N/A TT 1.00
ntu*
0.04 –

1.0 ntu

No 2019 Soil run-off  
 
                 
Contaminants

(Units)

MCLG MCL Level

Found

Range of

Detections

Violation Sample Typical Source of Contaminants
Turbidity

(NTU)

N/A TT 1.00
ntu*
0.04 –

1.0 ntu

No 2019 Soil run-off
 
Microcystins

(ppb)

NA 0.3 AL for children under 6 and sensitive populations

 

1.6 for children 6 and older and adults

0.01
ppb*
0.00-

0.074

ppb

No 2019 Produced by some naturally occurring cyanobacteria, also known as blue green algae, which under certain conditions

(i.e., high nutrient concentration and light intensity) may produce microcystins.

 
Total Organic Carbon N/A TT 2.47* 1.8-3.2 No 2019 Naturally present in the environment  
Inorganic Contaminants  
Nitrate                 (mg/L) 10 10 2.30

ppm*

1.76-

2.83

ppm

No 2019 Runoff from fertilizer use; erosion of natural deposits  
Fluoride

(mg/L)

NA 4.0 ppm 0.98

ppm*

0.86-

1.35

ppm

No 2019 Erosion of natural deposits. Water additive which promotes strong teeth, discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.  
Barium

(mg/L)

NA 2 ppm 0.018

ppm

N/A No 2019 Discharge of drilling wastes or metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits  
Volatile Organic Contaminants  
TTHM-Total Trihalomethanes

(ug/L)

0 na 72.10

ppb*

44.2-

107

ppb

No 2019 By-product of drinking water chlorination  
HAA5-Haloacetic Acid

(ug/L)

N/A 60ppb 22.53

ppb*

9.0-

27.1

ppb

No 2019 By-product of drinking water chlorination  
 
Lead and Copper  
Contaminants (units) Action Level (AL) Individual Results over the AL 90% of test levels were less than Violation Sampled Typical source of Contaminants
Lead (ppb) 15 ppb 0 0.0 ppb No 2019 Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits
Zero (0) out of 20 samples were found to have lead levels in excess of the lead action level of 15 ppb.  
Copper (ppm) 1.3 ppm 0 0.068 ppm No 2019 Erosions of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives; Corrosions of household plumbing systems
Zero (0) out of 20 samples were found to have copper levels in excess of the copper action level of 1.3 ppm.  

 

N/A:  Not Applicable

* Component of TTHM’s

*Level in the table based on the average of the detected limits for each sample of 2019

Definitions of some terms contained within this report.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG): The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL): The highest level of contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the   MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Parts per Million (ppm) or Milligrams per Liter (mg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant.  A part per million corresponds to one second in a little over 11.5 days.

Parts per Billion (ppb) or Micrograms per Liter (µg/L) are units of measure for concentration of a contaminant.  A part per billion corresponds to one second in 31.7 years.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal (MRDLG): The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL): The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which if exceeded, triggers treatment, or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT):  A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

NTU: Nephelometric Turbidity Unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU’s is just noticeable to the average person.

Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water and is an indication of the effectiveness of our filtration system.  The turbidity limit set by the EPA is 0.3 NTU in 95% of the daily samples and shall not exceed 5 NTU at any time.  As reported above the Delta Water Treatment Plant highest recorded turbidity result for 2019 was 0.12 NTU and the lowest monthly percentage of samples meeting the turbidity limits was 100%.  Turbidity has no health effects.  However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth.  Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease-causing organisms.  These organisms include bacteria, viruses and parasites that can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea and associated headaches.

Some people who drink water containing Trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Lead Educational Information

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant woman and young children.  Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing.  The Delta Water Treatment Plant is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components.  When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking.  If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested.  Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at:  800-426-4791 or http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population.  It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing.  If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using tap water.  Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

The value reported in the table under “level found” for Total Organic Carbon (TOC) is the lowest ratio between the percentages of TOC actually removed to the percentage of TOC required to be removed.  A value of greater than one (1) indicates that the water system is in compliance with TOC removal requirements. A value of less than one (1) indicates a violation of the TOC removal requirements.

 Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) Information

All water systems were required to begin compliance with a new rule, the Revised Total Coliform Rule, on April 1, 2016. The new rule maintains the purpose to protect public health by ensuring the integrity of the drinking water distribution system and monitoring for the presence of total coliform bacteria, which includes E. coli bacteria. The U.S. EPA anticipates greater public health protection under the new rule, as it requires water systems that are vulnerable to microbial contamination to identify and fix problems. As a result, under the new rule there is no longer a maximum contaminant level violation for multiple total coliform detections. Instead, the new rule requires water systems that exceed a specified frequency of total coliform occurrences to conduct an assessment to determine if any significant deficiencies exist. If found, these must be corrected by the PWS.

How do I participate in decisions concerning my drinking water?

Public participation and comment are encouraged at regular meetings of the Village of Delta council which meets every 1st and 3rd Monday of the month at 7:00 pm, in the council chambers, located in the Memorial Hall, 401 Main Street.

                For more information on your drinking water please feel free to contact David Daniel, Water Superintendent at 419-822-4143 extension 151.

If there are other people you know that use water from the Village of Delta and may not receive this notice (i.e., renters, trailer parks, senior centers, etc.), please let them know that this information is available.  Additional copies are available at the Village Hall (401 Main St) as well as at the Delta Water Treatment Plant (7697 Co. Rd. H).